WILDLAND FIRE INFORMATION, RESTRICTIONS & AIR QUALITY UPDATES

WILDLAND FIRE INFORMATION

Montana is 93 million acres of spectacular unspoiled nature. Because of our diverse landscape and weather, wildfires happen as a natural part of Montana’s ecology. Sometimes a fire occurs near a popular destination, but there’s no reason to let it stop you from enjoying your West Yellowstone experience. 

According to a recent report from the Montana Drought and Water Advisory Committee, Montana is experiencing the most severe drought in over 20 years. Extreme drought combined with the current forest health crisis has created a significant risk for wildfires. Help Montanans reduce the risk by recreating responsibly.


SMOKE & AIR QUALITY CONDITIONS

Air quality conditions across Montana can be impacted by smoke from numerous wildland fires within Montana and adjoining states, even sometimes Canada. Good to Moderate conditions span Montana right now as a ridge of high pressure returns the region to hot and dry conditions. This return will likely kick up fire activity, increasing the potential for smoke and haze over the state, especially directly downwind from active fires.

The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services maintains a website with health information related to wildfire smoke. To access it, click here.

Multiple factors contribute to air quality and conditions can change often. If smoke is heavy or you’re sensitive to it, you may wish to consider adjusting your itinerary until air quality improves. Even if you see smoke, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re close to a fire. Sometimes smoke blows in from hundreds of miles away. 

For up-to-date air quality conditions from the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, click here.



UPDATES


6.13.24: YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK FIRE ACTIVITY UPDATE

MODERATE fire danger in Yellowstone National Park

  • The parkwide fire danger level for Yellowstone is now MODERATE.
  • Currently, there is one active wildland fire in the park. The Milepost 17 Fire is controlled and there is little to no heat left in the lightning-ignited tree.
  • At this time, there are no fire restrictions in place or planned in the park.
  • Campfires are only permitted within established fire rings in campgrounds and some backcountry campsites.  
  • Campfires must always be attended and cold to the touch before abandoning. Soak, stir, feel, repeat.
  • The Greater Yellowstone area is a fire-adapted ecosystem. Fire plays an important role in maintaining the health of this area’s wildlife habitat and vegetation.
  • Stay informed about current fire activity in Yellowstone.

6.10.2024: First confirmed 2024 wildland fire in Yellowstone National Park

Parkwide fire danger LOW

  • On June 9, the first confirmed wildland fire of the season in Yellowstone National Park was detected by a motorist driving on Highway 191, located on the west side of the park.
  • The .1-acre lightning-ignited Milepost 17 Fire torched a single tree almost a mile west of Highway 191 and 17 miles north of West Yellowstone, Montana.
  • Yellowstone wildland firefighters are suppressing the fire, which is expected to be controlled today, June 10.

Stay informed

  • The parkwide fire danger level for Yellowstone is LOW.
  • Currently, there are no fire restrictions in place or planned in the park.
  • Campfires are only permitted within established fire rings in campgrounds and some backcountry campsites.
  • Campfires must always be attended and cold to the touch before abandoning. Soak, stir, feel, repeat.
  • The Greater Yellowstone area is a fire-adapted ecosystem. Fire plays an important role in maintaining the health of this area’s wildlife habitat and vegetation.
  • Stay informed about current fire activity in Yellowstone.

Public Affairs Office

Strategic Communications, Office of the Superintendent

Yellowstone National Park

Office: 307-344-2015

Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. M-F

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